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Osteopathy for Children

The principles that underpin Osteopathic care remain the same regardless of age, however children’s requirements differ depending on the stage of their development. Osteopathy can be helpful to support adaptation to change, whether that change be from being born, growth or the active endeavours of childhood and adolescence.

When you first visit you’ll be asked about the reason you have brought your child and their medical history. For babies and young children, this may include information about their birth. An examination is then conducted to determine if osteopathic care is appropriate to support your child’s health.

After this examination, your osteopath will discuss the care options available and you will then jointly decide on an appropriate and suitable plan. If everyone is in agreement, your child’s treatment may begin at the first appointment. It may be appropriate to recommend your child be referred to another health professional either instead of, or alongside osteopathic intervention to ensure the best possible care.

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Copyright - The General Osteopathic Council

The techniques we use to treat infants and children are gentle and balancing in nature and most children enjoy the experience. Most infants will have a sleep after treatment and children may feel tired. Very occasionally there will be a period of unsettledness that resolves within a day or so. All young people under the age of 16 years must be accompanied by an adult with parental responsibility throughout their treatment.

Osteopaths working with infants and children must have completed a four or five year degree qualification at an accredited university and are required to be registered with the General Osteopathic Council and comply with an annual renewal process.

Broomhill Clinic Practitioner

Vannin Bloch BSc Hons (Ost)

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                     Copyright - Jan Chlebik

Please Note: The title 'osteopath' is protected by law. It is against the law for anyone to call themselves an osteopath unless they are registered with the GOsC, which sets and promotes high standards of competency, conduct and safety. Vannin is on the GOsC Register.

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